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readmore-worryless:

"Too many books?" I believe the phrase you’re looking for is "not enough bookshelves".

(via beckyrenee)

Source: readmore-worryless
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lauren7167:

Zuhair Murad Haute Couture Spring 2014 | via Tumblr on We Heart It.

Source: weheartit.com
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centuriespast:

Germany and Italy

From the portfolio Königlich Bayerische Pinakothek zu München und Gemälde Gallerie zu Schleissheim (Munich: Piloty und Loehle 1837 42)

(Royal Bavarian Pinakothek in Munich and Painting Gallery at Schleissheim)

Germania and Italia

Ferdinand Piloty, German, 1786 - 1844. After a painting of 1815-28 by Johann Friedrich Overbeck, German, 1789 - 1869. Published by Piloty & Loehle, Munich.

Made in Munich, Bavaria, Germany, c. 1842

Lithograph

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Source: centuriespast
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ohstarstuff:

Galactic Center of Our Milky Way

The Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory — collaborated to produce an unprecedented image of the central region of our Milky Way galaxy.

Observations using infrared light and X-ray light see through the obscuring dust and reveal the intense activity near the galactic core. The center of the galaxy is located within the bright white region in the upper portion of the image. The entire image covers about one-half a degree, about the same angular width as the full moon.

Each telescope’s contribution is presented in a different color:

  • Yellow represents the near-infrared observations of Hubble. They outline the energetic regions where stars are being born as well as reveal hundreds of thousands of stars.
  • Red represents the infrared observations of Spitzer. The radiation and winds from stars create glowing dust clouds that exhibit complex structures from compact, spherical globules to long, stringy filaments.
  • Blue and violet represents the X-ray observations of Chandra. X-rays are emitted by gas heated to millions of degrees by stellar explosions and by outflows from the supermassive black hole in the galaxy’s center. The bright blue blob toward the bottom of the full field image is emission from a double star system containing either a neutron star or a black hole.

(via distant-traveller)

Source: chandra.harvard.edu
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